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Barracuda Yosemite Server Backup

Recovering from a Disaster

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Recovering your system requires you to make the following choices described here.

Do you want to recover your whole system or just the hard disk from which your system boots? If the volumes on your boot hard disk are split among multiple physical hard disks, you should recover the entire system and not just the boot disk. Otherwise, some system data may not be restored.

For local disaster recovery, you should use only full backup media created with the Overwrite all media option. After your system boots, you can use the standard Yosemite Server Backup options to restore any incremental or differential media to your system. Standard Yosemite Server Backup restore procedures optimize restoration, restoring incremental and differential media faster than the disaster recovery process.

Do you want to recover your system from media and devices anywhere in the backup domain (network recovery) or do you want to recover your system using devices attached only to this machine (local recovery)? You need to consider how you plan to restore your backed up data. Once you have successfully booted the machine you are recovering, you can either restore your backed up data from a locally attached device reading the backup media, or you can run a restore job using the Backup Server to set up a restore task which restores the backed up data from over the network.

It is good practice to disconnect any drives you do not want modified during the recovery process. This protects you from inadvertently overwriting them.

Disaster Recovery with Libraries

When performing disaster recovery with an OBDR library, make sure the first bootable media from the most recent full backup is loaded into slot 1 of the library. Yosemite Server Backup will only boot from the tape in slot 1.

Yosemite Server Backup restores all media that are contained in the library during the final recovery process. Therefore, make sure that you only load media in the library that you will need to restore during recovery.

Remove all media not associated with the recovery from the library. If the full backup spans more than one media, put the additional full backup media into additional slots.

Disaster Recovery for Windows 2008, Windows Vista, and Newer

You can view a short video about performing a network disaster recovery of a Windows client machine.

To perform disaster recovery for one of the above-listed Windows operating system, you need a full backup of the machine for which you want to perform the disaster recovery and a bootable iso to boot the machine into the Yosemite Server Backup recovery console.

  1. Insert the first bootable media into a drive or, if using a library, into any slot that can be booted from.
  2. Perform any special steps for booting your computer from the bootable device. (Refer to your device and system documentation.)
  3. When the computer boots from the recovery media, the Disaster Recovery Wizard welcome screen displays. Click Continue.
  4. The Disaster Recovery Wizard starts up the skeleton operating system and the recovery manager.
  5. If you are recovering a client machine, you need to choose the appropriate option indicating how you want to restore your data:
    1. To restore your data over the network, choose Recover your system from media and devices anywhere in the backup domain.
    2. To restore you data using only media read locally from an attached or internal device, choose recover your system using devices attached only to this machine.

      Because you cannot perform Network Recovery on a Backup Server, when recovering the Backup Server, local restore is assumed and you are not given a choice.

       

  6. Once the recovery manager has been started, if you selected Network Recovery in step 5 above, you are instructed to use your Backup Administrator, running on another machine, to create and run a restore job to complete recovery. In this case, you can skip to step 11.
    If you selected Local Recovery in step 5 above, the Disaster Recovery Wizard displays a list of source and target devices available on the system
    1. In the top list, select one or more source devices that you want to restore data from by placing a check mark next to them. 
    2. In the bottom list, select one or more target hard drives to restore. You do not need to restore all of them.

      You must select at least one source device and at least one target device. If you do not see all of the devices in the list that you expect, you can load a driver or rescan for devices:

      • To load a driver, click Load a driver, and then browse to the device driver file. The driver must be Vista or Server 2008-compatible in order to be loaded.

      • To rescan for devices, click Refresh. This is useful if you plug in a new SCSI device or some other device that is not plug-and-play compatible.

        

  7. If you have a tape loader as a source device, you can select it and choose the slots from which you will restore data. By default, all slots are selected.
  8. Click Next to start the recovery. A list of all volumes mounted when the backup was made displays. Each of these volumes is classified as critical or non-critical, and mount points are shown as children of each volume.

    A volume classified as critical cannot be deselected. You can deselect non-critical volumes and the recovery manager will not restore any files from those volumes. If you are using local recovery, unrestored files show up as skipped in the recovery status page.

     

  9. Recovery status displays while it is in progress.

  10. When the recovery finishes or is cancelled, you see a summary of what happened. If not all of the important objects were restored, you are warned, with each important, unrestored object listed.

  11. Once the recovery successfully completes, click Reboot to restart your system. After reboot, your system should be ready to log in to and use.

    If you used Local Disaster Recovery and you had incremental and differential backup media since the last full backup, use Yosemite Server Backup to restore the data from your incremental and differential backup media. SQL data and Exchange data from prior to Exchange 2010 must be restored in a separate step using a standard Restore job created through the Tasks menu on the Backup Server.

     

Disaster Recovery for Linux

You can view a short video about performing a network disaster recovery from a Linux client machine.

To perform disaster recovery for a Linux system:

  1. Remove all media from all cartridge disk drives, tape drives and/or library magazine slots.
  2. Insert the first bootable media:
    1. If you are using a single tape or removable disk drive, insert the first bootable media into the drive.
    2. If you are using a library, see Disaster Recovery with Libraries above.
  3. Perform any special steps for booting your computer from the bootable device (refer to your device and system documentation).
  4. Select Network Recovery to restore data from anywhere in the network, or Local Recovery to restore data from locally attached devices only.
  5. Press Enter.
  6. If a warning screen appears, read it, and then press F10.
  7. When the first confirmation message displays, Are you sure?, select the appropriate Yes option, and then press Enter.
  8. When the second confirmation message appears, select Yes, Perform the Recovery, and then press Enter. If you selected Network Recovery in step 4 above, you are instructed to use your Backup Server to create and run a restore job to complete recovery.
    If you selected Local Recovery in step 4 above, the system does not require any input from you until it finishes restoring the first media to your system. Restoring the first media can take from minutes to hours, depending on the amount of data on the media, the speed and capabilities of the device, and whether you are recovering the entire system or just the boot disk.
    1. For Local Recovery, after the system has restored the first media, it asks for the next media to restore. Press F10 to restore another media.
    2. After restoring the last media, remove the disaster recovery CD or DVD so that you can boot from the hard disk in subsequent steps.
  9. Press Esc. A message screen appears.
  10. Press F10. Yosemite Server Backup restarts your computer. After your computer has rebooted, log in.

    If you used Local Disaster Recovery and you had incremental and differential backup media since the last full backup, use Yosemite Server Backup to restore the data from your incremental and differential backup media.

     

Disaster Recovery for Windows 2003, Windows XP, and Earlier

To perform a disaster recovery for earlier Windows systems:

  1. Only disaster recovery media should be loaded in cartridge disk drives, tape drives and/or library magazine slots.
  2. Insert the first bootable media:
    1. If you are using a single tape or removable disk drive, insert the first bootable media into the drive.
    2. If you are using a library, see Disaster Recovery with Libraries above.
  3. Perform any special steps for booting your computer from the bootable device (refer to your device and system documentation).
  4. When the Disaster Recovery screen appears, select one of the following options:
    1. Recover Boot Disk. Select this option to only recover the boot disk. Use it if your boot disk is corrupt or if you replaced the boot disk.
    2. Recover Entire System. Select this option to recover data to multiple hard disks, including the boot disk. Use this option if you replaced one or more hard disks.
  5. Press Enter.
  6. Proceed through screens, reading and then pressing F10 to advance to the next screen.
  7. Because the re-partitioning of disks that follows this step is destructive, you are given two opportunities to confirm that you want to proceed with recovery, or you can cancel out of recovery. To continue with recovery, select the Yes option and press Enter each time.
    There are several phases to disaster recovery and your system will be rebooted at various points in the process. The machine may reboot several times if that is required by the operating system to complete certain recovery steps. Normally, you will only insert media when prompted to do so.
    The system does not require any input from you until it finishes restoring the first media to your system. Restoring the first media can take from minutes to hours, depending on the amount of data on the media, the speed and capabilities of the device and whether you are recovering the entire system or just the boot disk.
  8. After the system has restored the media, it asks for the next media to restore. Select Yes to restore another media.
  9. After restoring the last media, remove the disaster recovery media so that you can boot from the hard disk in subsequent steps.
  10. Additional Restore jobs are required to finish the recovery of these systems. Any databases, such as Exchange and SQL, must be restored.

    If you used Local Disaster Recovery and you had incremental and differential backup media since the last full backup, use Yosemite Server Backup to restore the data from your incremental and differential backup media. SQL data and Exchange data from prior to Exchange 2010 will need to be restored in a separate step using a standard Restore job created through the Tasks menu on the Backup Server.

     

 

 

 

 

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